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GEH In South Australia

  1. rossart

    760 Posts.
    9
    Moosey you will understand the following:

    Japanese conglomerate Hitachi and the US giant General Electric have developed a new PRISM reactor which recycles used nuclear fuel into “low-carbon electricity”.
    Mr McBride said it and other emerging technologies could be “game changers” for SA. “Storage is great, but when you actually fully spend these rods through a PRISM, you get to the point where the actual amount you’ve got to store is tiny,” he said.


    SA announces Royal Commission into nuclear power
    • by:Daniel Wills State Political Editor
    • From: The Advertiser
    • February 09, 20157:22AM




    A worker extracts uranium samples in Perth. Source: PerthNowSource: PerthNow
    CONSTRUCTION of a uranium enrichment plant could inject billions of dollars into the South Australian economy and modern waste-treatment facilities could double as cheap power generators if the state’s nuclear capacity is expanded, industry says.
    Premier Jay Weatherill has reversed decades of Labor opposition to the state taking a greater role in the uranium industry, yesterday announcing a royal commission to investigate opportunities for nuclear storage, uranium enrichment and power creation.
    It has raised immediate ire from the green lobby and been dismissed by the Opposition as a backflip and tactical distraction from health controversies.
    Mr Weatherill conceded the announcement was a major reversal from his previous stance on the nuclear industry. He said he now had an “open mind” amid opportunities for jobs and investment, and growing fears about climate change.
    “I have in the past been opposed to nuclear power, all elements of it,” he said. “I now have an open mind. “When the facts change, people should change their minds.”

    Premier Jay Weatherill says the time is right to have a debate on a possible role for SA in the production of nuclear power. Photo Sam Wundke



    mce-anchor
    What role do you think SA should play in the nuclear fuel cycle?

    Drilling for uranium at the Four Mile project in South Australia’s outback.



    Mr Weatherill said much of the debate around the industry was poorly informed and the commission aimed to “establish the facts” and allow an informed debate.
    “What we want to do is take mass opinion, and through a process of raising awareness through the provision of information and facts ... people can come up with a settled public judgment,” he said. “It needs to be a mature debate, it will be a robust debate.
    “That’s the only way in which we’re going to be able to grapple with such a big issue.”
    Precise terms of reference and the appointment of a commissioner and expert panel will be decided in coming days. No deadline has been set for the commission to report.
    Mr Weatherill said the plan had been considered by Cabinet but he only began informing the backbench yesterday ahead of the announcement. Labor’s party platform, as well as state and federal regulations, would need to change for the industry to grow.
    One of former premier Mike Rann’s biggest early political wins was overcoming a Federal Government push in 2004 to build a nuclear dump in the state’s north.
    Respondents to an Advertiser.com.au poll were overwhelmingly in support of the state entering into the nuclear storage, enrichment and energy industries.
    Seventy-five per cent supported SA adopting all three segments of the industry, while 15 per cent said the state should play no role at all in uranium. Seven per cent said we should stick to mining.
    BusinessSA chief executive Nigel McBride yesterday said the state could position itself as a global leader in nuclear technology and turn foreign waste into cheap local power.
    Japanese conglomerate Hitachi and the US giant General Electric have developed a new PRISM reactor which recycles used nuclear fuel into “low-carbon electricity”.
    Mr McBride said it and other emerging technologies could be “game changers” for SA. “Storage is great, but when you actually fully spend these rods through a PRISM, you get to the point where the actual amount you’ve got to store is tiny,” he said.
    “We can be the leading environmental and carbon-friendly recycler of poorly used nuclear waste to create cheap energy and a whole industry with new jobs.”
    SA Chamber of Mines and Energy chief executive Jason Kuchel said enrichment of uranium could bring billions of dollars in investment to the state, and create jobs.
    “There is significant potential for further processing of uranium,” he said.
    Opposition Leader Steven Marshall voiced concernes about the distraction, but was “happy to support an inquiry”.



    A nuclear future: The options for SA



    Storage
    South Australia’s far north has long been seen as a potential site for a waste dump and was targeted by the Federal Government more than a decade ago in plans that former premier Mike Rann railed against. The far outback is geologically stable and far from major population centres. Many nuclear nations are seeking sites for their waste and would be prepared to pay big dollars. However, there is potential reputational harm from being known as the nuclear dump state.

    Enrichment
    South Australia is already engaged in the nuclear cycle through its uranium exports and hopes to become an even bigger player should the shelved Olympic Dam expansion be given new life. However, much of the ore is shipped off shore before being processed elsewhere into energy-grade product. Enriching it here could add value and create jobs.

    Energy
    Nuclear energy has been raised as an option for the nation, but dismissed as non-commercial for Australia. It requires huge upfront investment and works best when there is a very large market to serve. However, new technology breakthroughs are creating smaller plants that can take waste from old-generation plans and convert it into energy while also treating it at the same time. Possible opportunities for the construction of nuclear plants in SA as the Playford B station in Port Augusta and Victoria’s Hazelwood facility are in line for decommission.

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