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  1. moosey

    11,521 Posts.
    210
    In a recent post of mine 14610211
    I was trying to work out what kind of savings they would make with these new cells that are coming? boy did I get it wrong.
    I will try and explain, I hope I have it right this time,please let me know if you can see if I have stuffed up again?


    First of all you will need this PDF.
    http://www2.semipv.com/solarcon/doc/Michael_Lebby.pdf


    Transitioning CPV technology to an ON Silicon Technology

    Now you will need to go to page 31 of that PDF look at the picture where it says there are 32 Triple Junction cells in each solar module which is 6cm by 6cm in area (made by Solar Systems at Abbotsford Melb) and they can make 500 MW worth of modules per year, that is 5 Mildura plants.
    There are 64 Modules (8 by 8) in each Solar converter, each module is 6cm by 6 cm (which makes 6cm squared in my book? which is 6 times more than 1 centimeter squared)
    Now go to page 33 and look at the heading
    CPV Solar Cells (old) run out about approximately $20 per centimeter squared whereas the new cells being developed run out between $1 and $2 per cm squared depending on their efficiency.
    OK now lets extrapolate that out for a plant the size of Mildura, I will do it for the older less efficient cells first which are around 40% efficient, or slightly more maybe?
    when you look at the cost of the older cells per centimeter square on page 33, they say approximately $20 per square centimeter
    I know that each solar module is 36 square centimeters i.e. 6cm by 6cm, and in each Solar Converter there are 64
    Modules so 36 square centimeters multiplied by $20 (ea sq cm is $20, multiplied by 64 Modules equals 36x20x64=$46080 per converter, if there are 2000 dishes (Mildura) then that would equate to $92,160,000 for the whole plant worth of converters.
    Now lets look at the price if it were $1 per cm squared, so 36 square centimeters per module @$1 per square centimeter multiplied by 64 modules equals $2304 per Solar converter multiplied by 2000 for the whole 100MW plant equals $4,608,000
    if the cells were $2 per square centimeter then obviously the cost would be double that, i.e. $9,216,000 for the converters in a plant the size of Mildura, but this is a far cry from the original cost of around $$92,160,000.
    You can also add to that the the reduction in the costs for the new dish and and the associated dual axis tracking mechanism and you can see where this is headed.
    It is worth remembering that they can change over the solar converter to a newer one with more efficiency in around 1 Hour per dish, you can't do this with any other CPV or flat panel installation as far as I know?

    The CS500-5 CPV Dish System deliversworld-leading solar energy conversion technology which is unrivalled in solar
    power generation.
    Today’s cells are currently rated at 35% efficiency with new cells due to be released in early 2011 running at around
    40%. Leading cell manufacturers are already developing next-generation cells expected to operate at 45% to 50%. The
    technical limit of performance for volume produced multi-junction cells is anticipated to approach 60% in the future.
    Solar Systems CPV Technology is relatively compact and utilizes minimal land area compared to other CPV
    technologies.
    Current land requirementsare approximately 6 acres per MW installed, however this will decrease as
    higher efficiency cells are introduced.


    CS500-5
    Concentrating
    SyoadsProduct
    Drawing:
    CS500-5
    Figure 2: Design loads for the Dish structure system.
    The CS500-5 output from a receiver is provided below normalized to 1000
    W/m2 at 25oC showing the output is greater than 35kW from a receiver


    When you look at the design of the Mildura plant which is 2000 dishes for 100MW there seems to have been
    a fair bit of improvement with the better efficiency cells because that equates to 50kW per reciever?



    .
    http://www.spectrolab.com/faqs-terrestrial.htm

    mce-anchor4. What is the output of the solar cell?

    A: To find the power output of the cell, you need to know the area, the incoming irradiance, and the efficiency. The efficiency is a function of the operating temperature — the cell loses approximately 0.05% absolute efficiency for every °C operation above the nominal 25°C. So if the efficiency at your operating temperature is 38%, and the incoming irradiance is 100 W/cm² (i.e., 1000x effective concentration), and the cell is a CDO-030, the expected power output is 0.38 × 100 × 0.3 = 11.4 Watts, and the remaining irradiance is lost to heat.

    mce-anchor8. For budgetary purposes, what is the price of the cells in large volume?


    A: Higher cell efficiency and reliability is critical for terrestrial CPV systems since it is the one component that leverages the cost effectiveness of the whole CPV system. Spectrolab's current price for a tested solar cell on a processed wafer, 1 sq. cm. in area, is about $0.20/Watt assuming an incident illumination intensity of 1000 suns, and measured at 25 degrees Celsius. Longer term we are working to achieve further cost reductions through performance improvements (efficiency), raw materials cost reductions, and productivity.



    All in all, I can definitely see why they would want these new cells, even for the difference in cost alone let alone the greater efficiency!



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