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eu referendum timetable

  1. gaweb

    2,154 posts.
    I know UK wants to join the EU for political reasons. BUT, if the UK pre-empt a strike on Iraq I personally hope the EU rejects them.

    BUDAPEST, Jan 3 (Reuters) - The European Union has approved
    its biggest-ever enlargement, paving the way for 10 candidates
    to join on May 1, 2004.
    This year the 15 existing EU parliaments must ratify the
    accession treaty, while the mainly ex-communist central European
    newcomers will go to the polls in national referendums, seeking
    a popular mandate to join the EU.
    Public support among candidates for EU entry is widespread,
    but there are pockets of euroscepticism, and not all referendums
    will be plain sailing.
    Two other candidates, Romania and Bulgaria, will not join
    the enlarged EU until 2007. Turkey will begin negotiations in
    2005, if it passes a human rights review in December 2004.
    HUNGARY:
    Referendum: April 12
    Public opinion: Strong 'Yes' support at 70-75 percent, with
    opposition about 11 percent.
    Notes: Non-binding, but Prime Minister Peter Medgyessy
    insists he needs a popular mandate before signing the accession
    treaty in Athens in late April.
    SLOVAKIA:
    Referendum: June 7 (final decision by February)
    Public opinion: Support for membership is above 70 percent,
    with the 'No' camp just below 15 percent.
    Notes: Mandatory binding referendum with at least 50 percent
    turnout. Lower turnout would render the vote invalid, and a new
    referendum cannot be held for three years.
    POLAND:
    Referendum: June 8, or autumn (to be confirmed)
    Public opinion: 56 percent likely to vote, 68 percent of
    whom would back EU entry.
    Notes: Poland is amending referendum rules to ensure EU
    entry has clear popular support. But the changes might delay the
    vote and complicate ratification because a two-thirds majority
    would be needed in both houses of parliament if voter turnout is
    below 50 percent. No previous post-communist referendum has had
    a 50 percent turnout.
    CZECH REPUBLIC:
    Referendum: June 15-16
    Public opinion: Support looks to have risen above 50
    percent, with opposition at about 18 percent.
    Notes: Binding vote, but no minimum turnout rule. No repeat
    referendum for at least two years.
    SLOVENIA:
    Referendum: First half 2003 (decision expected in January)
    Public opinion: 'Yes' camp comfortably above 60 percent,
    with 'No' vote about 23 percent.
    Notes: Non-binding referendum.
    ESTONIA:
    Referendum: Sept 14
    Public opinion: Most recent poll shows EU support has jumped
    to 57 percent, while opposition has dipped to 36 percent.
    Notes: Referendum will be non-binding, with no minimum
    turnout requirement. No coordinated anti-EU movement, but
    critical umbrella group could emerge. No contingency plans yet
    in the event of a 'No' vote.
    LATVIA:
    Referendum: September 20
    Public opinion: 'Yes' vote has risen above 46 percent, with
    opposition steady at close to 36 percent.
    Notes: Binding referendum with minimum turnout of at least
    50 percent. No anti-EU group, but high potential given strong
    anti-EU sentiment. Analysts have said a 'No' vote would result
    in a second referendum to coincide with the next general
    election, due in 2006.
    LITHUANIA:
    Referendum: May (date to be confirmed)
    Public opinion: 'Yes' camp has grown to about 68 percent,
    with 'No' vote slipping to 19 percent.
    Notes: Likely to be binding referendum, with simple majority
    as long as at least 50 percent of voters take part. Opposition
    comes mainly from small populist parties; foes are more
    issue-specific than anti-EU. No bar to holding a second vote in
    the event of a 'No' win, but wording would probably be revised.
    MALTA:
    Referendum: early 2003
    Public opinion: Probably the most eurosceptic candidate.
    Polls show a relative majority in favour of accession, but a
    high percentage of voters remain undecided.
    Notes: Non-binding vote. Malta is expected to hold a general
    election next year; anti-EU Labour opposition says, if in power,
    it would seek alternative partnership with EU instead.
    CYPRUS:
    Referendum: None. In the absence of a deal on a U.N.
    reunification plan, Cyprus's House of Representatives is
    expected to ratify EU membership, probably by mid-April. In the
    event of a deal between Greek and Turkish Cypriots, there could
    be a public vote on March 30 on both reunification and EU entry.
    Public opinion: Pro-EU support among Greek Cypriots is above
    75 percent, with some rural opposition.


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