EIF eiffel technologies limited

Been a long wait!

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    HOMEX - Melbourne

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    In a breakthrough insulin study announced today, Eiffel Technologies
    Ltd (EIF: ASX) has successfully employed its supercritical fluid
    re-engineering techniques to dramatically increase the effectiveness
    of insulin in preclinical studies. In a consultant report on the
    Eiffel preclinical studies, by the renowned international expert on
    diabetes and Director of the International Diabetes Institute in
    Australia, Professor Paul Zimmet, he said "this micronised form (of
    insulin) is at least three times as effective, and possibly more so,
    than the native insulin".

    Independent animal trials were conducted earlier this year by the
    Metabolic Research Unit at Deakin University to investigate the
    effects of particle re-engineering on pharmaceutical grade insulin
    using supercritical fluid (SCF) technology. The insulin was
    re-engineered by Eiffel Technologies, a specialist chemical
    engineering company that uses supercritical fluid processing
    techniques to reduce drug particle size and achieve controlled
    particle design of new and existing pharmaceutical compounds.

    The preclinical studies examined the effect on blood glucose levels
    in rats of SCF processed insulin and compared the result with
    standard pharmaceutical grade insulin, producing some surprising
    results. "The micronised insulin not only retains full activity in
    reducing blood glucose concentrations in the rats after SCF
    processing but also has an enhanced hypoglycaemic effect," said
    Professor Zimmet. "In addition, the duration of action of the
    micronised insulin appears to be greater than the native insulin."

    Over 40% of pharmaceutical products on the market have problems with
    bioavailability and SCF techniques are being rapidly investigated for
    their ability to improve the performance of pharmaceuticals within
    the body and also to offer alternative and more patient-friendly
    delivery. "It is clear from the data that the supercritical fluid
    processing of the insulin does not reduce its activity and, in fact,
    appears to enhance it," said Professor Zimmet. The International
    Diabetes Institute predicts there are 60 - 70 million people
    worldwide requiring insulin therapy and this figure is expected to
    double by 2025.

    The findings in this report are important on a number of fronts. The
    pharmaceutical market for diabetes is estimated at over US$7 billion
    a year and SCF reprocessing may offer significant cost reductions for
    insulin manufacturers. The extended duration of action of the SCF
    processed insulin also suggests that the frequency of injection by
    people with diabetes may be reduced.

    The results with the insulin protein also suggests this technology
    may have applications for other therapeutic protein/peptide drugs
    where the main considerations of delivery (predominantly by
    injection) and cost of manufacture could be addressed. There are over
    100 therapeutic proteins and peptides currently on the market with
    over 350 in development. Eiffel Technologies recently filed a
    provisional patent application relating to the results from this
    insulin study.

    In Australia, diabetes is one of the most costly diseases in both
    human and economic terms. Its annual cost to the nation exceeds $1.2
    billion, it shortens life expectancy by up to 15 years, and its level
    of incidence has trebled since 1981. It is a major risk factor for
    heart disease, kidney failure and blindness. Type 1 diabetes results
    from an autoimmune destruction of the pancreatic beta cells which
    produce insulin. In this form of diabetes, insulin is required for
    survival and it accounts for 10% of all persons with diabetes in
    Australia. Type 2 diabetes is characterised by the body's resistance
    to insulin and the impaired insulin production by the pancreas. It
    accounts for over 85% of people with diabetes in Australia. Obesity
    and a sedentary lifestyle are major contributors to Type 2 diabetes
    and lifestyle intervention is the primary approach to disease
    management. Over half the number of cases of diabetes in Australia go
    undiagnosed.

    Eiffel Technologies Ltd, is a bioengineering company focused on
    improving the performance and delivery of pharmaceuticals, proteins
    and peptides. Based in Melbourne, Australia, the company is dedicated
    to the development and commercialisation of SCF drug re-engineering
    technologies to improve therapeutic outcomes and patient
    administration of new and currently marketed pharmaceuticals. Eiffel
    Technologies Ltd has international collaborations with Sheffield
    Pharmaceuticals Inc, Amarin Corporation Plc, Profile Therapeutics Plc
    and BattellePharma Inc. For more information on Eiffel, see the
    Company website www.eiffeltechnologies.com.au for details.


    For further information, please contact:

    Professor Paul Zimmet
    DIRECTOR
    National Diabetes Research Institute
    Phone: +61 3 9258 5049

    Christine Cussen
    CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER
    Eiffel Technologies Limited
    Phone: +61 3 9629 8022
    [email protected]
 
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